Winner of the Minister’s Award for Overall Excellence for 2018, category for medium enterprises

Excellence does not necessarily mean perfection

While a thesaurus might throw up synonyms such as “perfection” and “flawlessness” for the word “excellence”, they don’t mean the same thing at all in the book of Teryl Schroenn, CEO of Accsys. The payroll and HR software company won no fewer than six awards in the 2018 tt100 competition, more than any other winner.

“Excellence is not doing everything perfectly; it means being on the right path – for now,” she says, adding that this particular path does not have an end destination. “The biggest mistake, in business or life, is thinking you’ve gotten somewhere.”

In other words, complacency, resting on one’s laurels or taking success for granted are sure-fire ways to lose momentum and become stuck, whether as a person or a business. “You’ve got to keep on asking what’s next and continue re-examining and questioning yourself.”

Teryl and her fellow senior executives at Accsys do this regularly by looking at the company through the eyes of a stranger. “When we walk in the door, we ask ourselves what a stranger would see if they came into our offices.”

This is a useful exercise because a familiar eye, accustomed to the way things are done, tends to overlook things that a stranger might instantly spot.

Another valuable tool for keeping forward momentum in the business is to constantly ask Accsys’s people for feedback and to act upon it. This is something many companies say they do but relatively few embed in their culture, let alone act on – which is why they might see the same issues keep cropping up again and again.

At Accsys, formal and informal feedback mechanisms tend to bring new topics to light, some of them surprising. One of the latest to raise its head is the company’s dress code. “We’ve just done a confidential employee survey and found there are people who are not happy with the dress code; they think it’s too formal,” Teryl says.

While no one felt adamantly enough about the issue to say they strongly disagreed with the dress code, the fact that almost 30% of staff raised it in the survey meant it was important enough for the top management team to take another look at. Teryl says they are looking at ways to “soften” the dress code somewhat without going too far. The company dress code might seem like a fairly minor business problem but that’s actually the point: when you deal with the small issues as and when they arise, they won’t escalate into big, intractable crises. Incremental progress, step by step, is the path of excellence.

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